By Center for Dermatology & Skin Care
February 11, 2020
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Acne   Acne Treatment  

Anyone who has ever walked through the skincare aisle of their local drugstore knows that there are tons of acne-fighting products on the market. So, which one is right for you? Should you opt for an acne cleanser or spot treatment, or both? Choosing the right acne treatment can be challenging, to say the least.

While acne is a common problem among teenagers, many people don’t just leave acne behind the minute they toss out those graduation caps. In fact, many adults well into their 20s, 30s and beyond still deal with regular acne outbreaks. So, how do you properly treat acne? There is no singular way to treat acne and the best treatment option for you and your skin will depend on the cause. While you might not know what’s to blame for your acne symptoms a dermatologist certainly can help.

Treating Acne on Your Own

If you are dealing with mild to moderate acne, look for products that contain these powerful acne-fighting ingredients:

  • Salicylic acid
  • Benzoyl peroxide
  • Glycolic acid
  • Sulfur
  • Retinol

How a Dermatologist Treats Acne

If you’ve tried over-the-counter acne products for more than 12 weeks and aren’t seeing results, or if you are experiencing severe, deep or cystic acne then it’s time to turn to a skin care professional for help. The first thing your dermatologist will do is determine the cause of your acne. From there, one or more of these treatments may be recommended:

Prescription topical medications: Certain topical medications act as an anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory, which reduces redness and inflammation associated with acne while also removing acne-causing bacteria from the surface of the skin.

A simple extraction: You should never pick at your acne or try to pop a pimple on your own, as you could end up causes further irritation or scarring; however, a dermatologist knows the safest and most effective techniques for extracting blackheads and whiteheads safely.

Birth control pills: For women who notice breakouts that correspond to their menstrual cycle, certain birth control pills may be able to reduce the amount of androgen hormones, which in turn can reduce breakouts. Talk to your dermatologist about the birth control pills that are FDA approved to treat acne.

Isotretinoin: This is an extremely intense oral retinoid that is used for treating severe, cystic acne that isn’t responsive to other treatment options. Isotretinoin is better known as Accutane, and this treatment can take up to nine months to see full results. Some patients will require multiple courses of treatment. Due to the nature of this strong medication, there are some possible side effects. It is important to discuss these side effects with your dermatologist before beginning Isotretinoin.

If you are having trouble getting your acne under control it’s important that you have a dermatologist that you can turn to for customized care. Take control of your acne once and for all.

By Center for Dermatology & Skin Care
January 29, 2020
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Moles  

Do you have a mole? Chances are good that you have few of them, actually. The average person has around 30-40 moles, and while moles are usually nothing to worry about it is important to be able to spot any changes that could be warning signs of skin cancer. That’s why you should perform self-exams every month to check the state of your moles. Just because they could be harmless doesn’t mean you should ignore them.

A mole that develops after the age of 30, a mole that bleeds or a changing mole could be a sign of melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer. This is why it’s important to check your moles regularly. When found early, melanoma is highly treatable. When it comes to pinpointing melanoma your dermatologist may teach you about the ABCDE's of skin cancer:

Asymmetry: If you were to draw a line down the middle of a mole both sides would be completely symmetrical; however, an asymmetrical mole could be a sign of melanoma.

Border: Melanoma is more likely to produce growths that have jagged or poorly defined edges.

Color: Healthy moles are usually a single color, while melanoma will often contain different colors or dark spots.

Diameter: Most healthy moles are smaller than a pencil eraser. If you notice that one or more moles are getting bigger you should speak to your dermatologist.

Evolution: Moles stay relatively the same over time; therefore, if you notice any changes to the size, color, shape, or texture then it’s time to consult with a skincare professional.

Of course, melanoma isn’t the only type of skin cancer to be on the lookout for. The two most common types of non-melanoma skin cancers include basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. Basal cell carcinomas often present as waxy-looking pale bumps on the skin, often on the head or neck, while squamous cells feel like firm nodules that may be smooth at first but become scaly.

Even if you aren’t noticing changes in your moles it’s still a good idea to schedule a skin cancer screening with your dermatologist once a year. Those at an increased risk for skin cancer may want to discuss coming in more often for exams. This exam is non invasive and could just save your life. If you’ve never had a skin cancer screening before it’s high time that you scheduled one.

By Center for Dermatology & Skin Care
January 13, 2020
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Hyperhidrosis   Sweating  

Excessive sweating, also known as hyperhidrosis, can be an annoying, embarrassing condition to deal with. Perspiring is normal, but hyperhidrosis is characterized by excessive sweating when your body doesn’t need to be cooled down.

One of the most common ways to tell whether you have hyperhidrosis is if one or two areas of your body are very sweaty, but the rest of your body is dry. Some common areas to experience hyperhidrosisinclude your head, feet, palms of your hands, and your underarms.

If you are experiencing excessive sweating, there are ways to minimize the impact. Consider trying these easy remedies:

  • Changing to antiperspirant, not deodorant
  • Using armpit shields to help absorb perspiration
  • Wearing loose clothing made of natural fibers like cotton
  • Changing your socks at least twice during the day
  • Wearing black and white clothing to reduce signs of sweating
  • Limiting or avoiding alcohol and spicy foods because they can worsen sweating

For moderate to severe cases of hyperhidrosis that aren’t managed well with conservative home therapies, it’s best to visit your dermatologist. There are several effective treatments for excessive sweating your dermatologist may recommend, including:

  • Prescription antiperspirant products containing aluminum chloride
  • Iontophoresis, which uses a weak electrical current to block the sweat glands from producing sweat; treatments are completely pain-free and take 20 to 30 minutes per treatment. 2 to 4 treatments per week are recommended with maintenance treatments every 1 to 4 weeks.
  • Botox injections, which help to reduce sweating; injections of botox are given into areas affected. Botox typically requires 15 to 20 injections and takes 30 to 45 minutes. The effects of injections can last for a few months and Botox treatment can be repeated if necessary.

Excessive sweating can disrupt your life, hampering your self-confidence. You can get relief from excessive sweating from your dermatologist. To find out more about treatment for excessive sweating, and other medical and cosmetic skincare treatments, talk with your dermatologist today!

By Center for Dermatology & Skin Care
December 12, 2019
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Eczema  

Do you have itchy, scaly rashes? If so, you could have eczema, a common skin condition that could be effectively treated by your dermatologist. Eczema is also called atopic dermatitis, and it can be caused by environmental factors, such as exposure to harsh chemicals. Dry skin can also affect your skin’s ability to form a barrier to allergens, which can lead to eczema. Another common cause of eczema is genetics. If someone in your family suffers from eczema, it increases your chances of developing eczema as well. Immune system problems can also cause eczema.

Both adults and children can develop eczema, however, children are most often affected, especially before they reach the age of five. Eczema develops into a chronic skin condition, with intermittent flare-ups. These flare-ups can often be accompanied by hay fever or asthma.

There are many common signs and symptoms of eczema, including:

  • Reddish-brown patches on your feet, hands, ankles, knees, chest, elbows, face, and scalp
  • Chronic, severe itching which often worsens at night
  • Inflamed, raw, red, sensitive, and swollen skin
  • Dry, cracked, scaly skin patches on various areas of your body
  • Bumps appearing on your skin which drain fluid and crust over later

For mild cases of eczema, there are a few simple home remedies you can try, including:

  • Taking over-the-counter antihistamine medications
  • Smoothing calamine or other anti-itch lotion over your skin
  • Applying moisturizer when you take a shower
  • Applying cool, wet dressings and bandages to affected areas
  • Taking a warm baking soda or oatmeal bath
  • Placing a humidifier in your home to moisten dry air
  • Wearing breathable, cool, cotton clothing

For moderate to severe cases of eczema, you should visit your dermatologist. There are several effective professional treatments your dermatologist may recommend, such as:

  • Prescription-strength oral and topical medications to stop itching
  • Antibiotic medications to eliminate any underlying infection
  • Oral or injectable anti-inflammatory medications to reduce swelling and pain
  • Corticosteroid dressings to reduce inflammation
  • Natural light or ultraviolet therapy to reduce or eliminate skin patches

You don’t have to suffer with eczema when relief is just a phone call away. Learn more about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of eczema by calling your dermatologist today!

By Center for Dermatology & Skin Care
December 06, 2019
Category: Dermatology
Tags: Vitiligo  

Vitiligo is a skin condition that affects more than 200,000 men and women in the United States each year, with half of those affected noticing symptoms before age 20. Although the exact cause of vitiligo is unknown, it is thought to be an auto-immune condition. In fact, it often occurs in combination with other auto-immune conditions, including rheumatoid arthritis. Additionally, the condition is directly linked to hereditary causes in about one-third of cases.

When you have vitiligo, you will have patches of white skin, caused by loss of melanocytes, the skin cells responsible for skin color. It can start on the feet, hands, or face, and become progressive over other areas of the body. The condition can cause problems with your skin, eyes, inner ear, hairs, and mucous membranes, causing white blotches in these areas.

Vitiligo cannot be cured, however, your dermatologist can help treat its symptoms and minimize its impact on your life. Treatment for this condition generally aims to restore normal skin color by repigmenting the skin. New melanocytes may be transferred from other areas of the body, including the base of hair follicles, or the edge of the affected area. Repigmentation is a gradual process that can take months to years.

Other treatments for vitiligo include prescription steroid creams or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory creams, These creams are applied twice each day and begin to show results in three-to-six months.

Lasers are also an effective treatment to promote repigmentation of the skin. The Excimer laser is a common tool that uses ultraviolet B light. A series of laser sessions is required with touch-up maintenance sessions later on.

Vitiligo can also be treated with some cosmetics to create a more uniform skin color and hide white patches. Sunless tanning products can also help darken the white patches, creating a more harmonious skin color. For extensive areas of pigmentation loss, depigmentation therapy might be recommended to bleach out all pigmented skin, producing an even skin tone.

If you have been struggling with vitiligo, call your dermatologist today to learn about your treatment options!





This website includes materials that are protected by copyright, or other proprietary rights. Transmission or reproduction of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use, as defined in the copyright laws, requires the written permission of the copyright owners.

Contact Us

Center for Dermatology & Skin Care

(304) 766-9136
607 Chestnut St Charleston, WV 25309